Exact Scripts for a Coffee Meeting

Now comes the hard part.

You’ve got an idea of a person you want to meet in your industry.  Maybe you’ve already met, but you’re looking to solidify the relationship, get into a deeper conversation.

Now, you have to actually go out and talk to someone in the real world.

It’s funny how our minds play tricks on us.  There are literally no stakes to asking somebody out for coffee.  You won’t die.  You won’t get injured.  The worst thing that can happen is the person says “no.”  If you never asked, you wouldn’t have been going to coffee anyway.  Nothing lost.

Still, the first 10 times I tried talking to new people, I got so nervous.  I still get nervous about asking somebody more senior for advice.

So I wrote these scripts for myself to use when I email or talk to people on the phone.  Hope they’re useful for you as well.

Setting up the meeting

Send an email or call on the phone with the following script (tweak it a little so it sounds like you and not like me):

Hi Dan,

My name is Jessie, and I’m a social media coordinator at ABC Company.  I found your information from The Intl Assoc of Marketers directory – I’m a member, too.  I loved the insights you had to share in the panel discussion you did last week.

I’m thinking of making the switch from social media to copywriting, and I was hoping to pick your brain about the transition since you also made the move to copywriting.

I’d love to set up a time to chat next week and hear your expertise, no more than 20 minutes of your time – I promise.

Would Tuesday around 2pm work?

Hope to hear from you soon,

Jessie

You won’t receive a response from every email you send out.  Some will say no.  That’s okay.  All we need is one “yes.”

Arriving at the meeting

Get there early.  Do not, do not, do not be late.

When the other person walks in, shake hands, order the coffee, you pay for it (this person is doing you a favor) unless they insist, find a place to sit.

Say these things:

I really appreciate you taking the time to meet with me… [Let them respond]

You’ve got a bit more experience than I do. How long have you been in the industry? [Let them respond, then ask follow-ups: where did you start? How did you learn?]

And you’re off.  This conversation should be 80% them talking.  only in the last 20% should you ask questions pertinent to yourself. So, in a 20 minute conversation, 16 minutes should be about them, only 4 about you.

If you find the conversation slowing, here are some good questions to memorize.  These questions require that you do research and know about the person ahead of time.  LinkedIn is great for this.

  • I know you started out in x industry, how did you end up in y industry?  How did you think about making the switch?
  • Early in your career were there any books or learning tools that stood out as particularly effective?
  • What were some of your favorite projects you worked on at XYZ company?

Be careful that it doesn’t turn into an interrogation, asking so may questions.  Instead, use a few phrases like this to break the questions:

  • It must have been difficult/exciting/stressful/etc doing x while also doing y… [Let them chime in]
  • That’s really impressive/brave/interesting/etc that you were able to accomplish x in y amount of time

Asking for advice

Toward the tail end of your conversation, frame up the reason why you need advice.  Tell the person about your current situation and what you’re trying to do.

Be careful.  Do not ramble on and on about your problems.  2 to 3 sentences should be enough to generally describe your situation.

Explain what you’re currently thinking.  “I’ve already tried a, b, and c.”

 

Then ask for the advice.  “I’m thinking about doing x, y, or z next.  How would you approach my project/decision/problem?”

If you’re job hunting, this is the part where you ask for advice on how to get into the industry.  Do not ask outright for a job.

When you get your answer, make note of the important parts.  What things are actionable?  What can I implement tomorrow or in the coming days?

Repeat those action items to the person you’re meeting with.  Tell them how thankful you are for the advice.  Let them know that you’ll definitely buy a copy of that book/try implementing that habit/get in touch with the suggested person.

The part most people skip

Do not skip this part: Actually follow through on the advice you received.

Try it out and let the person know how it went.  This is the basis for a relationship now.  If you have trouble implementing the advice, ask for help.  If the advice works, share your results.

This is the key to building lasting relationships.

Relationships are what get you to your dream career.

 

The next step

Now that you have advice and insider information on the industry, let’s see how to get intelligence on a target company that might hire you.

Take me to Part 4! – coming soon

 


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